2018_Hemp_Farming_Act_00055

Environmental Policy News — ScienceDaily Environmental Policy. Read policy recommendations from scientists and scientific organizations on many aspects of environmental policy. Background research available.

Global Warming News — ScienceDaily Global Warming Research. Learn about the causes and effects of global warming. Consider possible global warming solutions. Read predictions of rising sea levels, coral reef bleaching and mass extinctions climate change may cause.

  • Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland
    on January 22, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    A new study uses machine learning to project migration patterns resulting from sea-level rise. Researchers found the impact of rising oceans will ripple across the country, beyond coastal areas at risk of flooding, as affected people move inland. Popular relocation choices will include land-locked cities such as Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Denver and Las Vegas. The model also predicts suburban and rural areas in the Midwest will experience disproportionately large influx of people relative to their smaller local populations.

  • Climate change could unlock new microbes and increase heat-related deaths
    on January 22, 2020 at 5:21 pm

    Scientists warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans’ ability to regulate body temperature.

  • Quo vadis Antarctic bottom water?
    on January 22, 2020 at 4:04 pm

    The formation of deep water, which is an important component of the climate system, takes place in only a few parts of the ocean: In the subpolar North Atlantic and in a few places in the Southern Hemisphere. There, the so-called Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is formed. While today AABW is circulating northwards into the other ocean basins, results of a new study show, that this was different under extreme climatic conditions in the past.

  • Earth’s oldest asteroid strike linked to ‘big thaw’
    on January 22, 2020 at 3:05 pm

    Scientists have discovered Earth’s oldest asteroid strike occurred at Yarrabubba, in outback Western Australia, and coincided with the end of a global deep freeze known as a Snowball Earth. The research used isotopic analysis of minerals to calculate the precise age of the Yarrabubba crater for the first time, putting it at 2.229 billion years old — making it 200 million years older than the next oldest impact.

  • Human-sparked fires smaller, less intense but more frequent with longer seasons
    on January 22, 2020 at 1:05 pm

    Fires started by people have steadily increased in recent decades, sparking a major shift in U.S. wildfire norms, according to a new study. The research found human-caused wildfires are more frequent, smaller, less hot and occur over longer seasons than fires started by lightning.

Exotic Species News — ScienceDaily Learn how invasive species threaten ecosystems. Read current research on biodiversity loss due to introduced species and more.

  • Native Americans did not make large-scale changes to environment prior to European contact
    on January 22, 2020 at 5:37 pm

    Contrary to long-held beliefs, humans did not make major changes to the landscape prior to European colonization, according to new research. These new insights into the past could help to inform how landscapes are managed in the future.

  • Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why
    on January 22, 2020 at 1:05 pm

    Despite their reputation as blood-suckers, mosquitoes actually spent most of their time drinking nectar from flowers. Scientists have identified the chemical cues in flowers that stimulate mosquitoes’ sense of smell and draw them in. Their findings show how cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — information that could help develop less toxic repellents and better traps.

  • Research supports new approach to mine reclamation
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    Geomorphic reclamation is a relatively novel approach intended to mimic the topography of nearby undisturbed lands, with a wide variety of terrain that is stable and less susceptible to erosion.

  • Life aquatic for many spider species
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    Researchers have found that nearly one fifth of all spider families are associated with saltwater or freshwater aquatic habitats. Their findings address the common misconception that all spiders dwell on land, and reveal surprising evolutionary pathways of this group from a land-based existence back to a water-based existence.

  • Platypus on brink of extinction
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    New research calls for action to minimize the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs.

Exotic Species News — ScienceDaily Learn how invasive species threaten ecosystems. Read current research on biodiversity loss due to introduced species and more.

  • Native Americans did not make large-scale changes to environment prior to European contact
    on January 22, 2020 at 5:37 pm

    Contrary to long-held beliefs, humans did not make major changes to the landscape prior to European colonization, according to new research. These new insights into the past could help to inform how landscapes are managed in the future.

  • Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why
    on January 22, 2020 at 1:05 pm

    Despite their reputation as blood-suckers, mosquitoes actually spent most of their time drinking nectar from flowers. Scientists have identified the chemical cues in flowers that stimulate mosquitoes’ sense of smell and draw them in. Their findings show how cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — information that could help develop less toxic repellents and better traps.

  • Research supports new approach to mine reclamation
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    Geomorphic reclamation is a relatively novel approach intended to mimic the topography of nearby undisturbed lands, with a wide variety of terrain that is stable and less susceptible to erosion.

  • Life aquatic for many spider species
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    Researchers have found that nearly one fifth of all spider families are associated with saltwater or freshwater aquatic habitats. Their findings address the common misconception that all spiders dwell on land, and reveal surprising evolutionary pathways of this group from a land-based existence back to a water-based existence.

  • Platypus on brink of extinction
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    New research calls for action to minimize the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs.

Water News — ScienceDaily Learn about Earth’s water resources. Read current research on the water cycle, water pollution, groundwater depletion and lake protection.

  • The secret of strong underwater mussel adhesion revealed
    on January 23, 2020 at 2:58 pm

    Scientists have identified a mechanism of adhesive proteins in a mussel that controls the surface adhesion and cohesion. They substantiated the synergy of molecules in adhesive proteins. Their new discovery is expected to be applied in making stronger underwater bioadhesive than the conventional ones.

  • Keeping lead out of drinking water when switching disinfectants
    on January 22, 2020 at 10:56 pm

    Researchers found that the hazards of switching disinfectants in water systems — increased lead levels — can be mitigated if the change is done correctly.

  • What’s in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals
    on January 22, 2020 at 8:43 pm

    Using a new ‘non-targeted’ approach, researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present.

  • Deep diving scientists discover bubbling CO2 hotspot
    on January 22, 2020 at 8:43 pm

    Hydrologists diving off the coast of the Philippines have discovered volcanic seeps with some of the highest natural levels of C02 ever recorded. The scientists were working in Verde Island Passage, one of the most diverse marine ecosystems in the world and is home to thriving coral reefs.

  • Sea level rise could reshape the United States, trigger migration inland
    on January 22, 2020 at 8:00 pm

    A new study uses machine learning to project migration patterns resulting from sea-level rise. Researchers found the impact of rising oceans will ripple across the country, beyond coastal areas at risk of flooding, as affected people move inland. Popular relocation choices will include land-locked cities such as Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Denver and Las Vegas. The model also predicts suburban and rural areas in the Midwest will experience disproportionately large influx of people relative to their smaller local populations.

Drought News — ScienceDaily Drought Research. Read where droughts are predicted, and what can be done about them.

  • Platypus on brink of extinction
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    New research calls for action to minimize the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs.

  • Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests
    on January 20, 2020 at 4:34 pm

    River flow is reduced in areas where forests have been planted and does not recover over time, a new study has shown. Rivers in some regions can completely disappear within a decade. This highlights the need to consider the impact on regional water availability, as well as the wider climate benefit, of tree-planting plans.

  • Scientists link La Niña climate cycle to increased diarrhea
    on December 30, 2019 at 3:47 pm

    A study finds that spikes in cases of life-threatening diarrhea in young children are associated with La Niña climate conditions. The findings could provide the basis for an early-warning system that would allow public health officials to prepare for periods of increased diarrhea cases as long as seven months ahead of time.

  • How do conifers survive droughts? Study points to existing roots, not new growth
    on December 30, 2019 at 3:47 pm

    As the world warms, a new study is helping scientists understand how coniferous forests may respond to drought. The research addresses a classic question in the field: When conditions are dry for long periods of time, do trees survive by growing new roots to tap water sources, or by relying on established roots that already go deep?

  • Amazon forest regrowth much slower than previously thought
    on December 19, 2019 at 5:25 pm

    The regrowth of Amazonian forests following deforestation can happen much slower than previously thought, a new study shows. The findings could have significant impacts for climate change predictions as the ability of secondary forests to soak up carbon from the atmosphere may have been over-estimated. The study, which monitored forest regrowth over two decades, shows that climate change, and the wider loss of forests, could be hampering regrowth in the Amazon.

Wildfires News — ScienceDaily Learn about the science of wildfires — risk factors, smoke emissions, effective controls, role in forest ecology and long-term problems.

  • Native Americans did not make large-scale changes to environment prior to European contact
    on January 22, 2020 at 5:37 pm

    Contrary to long-held beliefs, humans did not make major changes to the landscape prior to European colonization, according to new research. These new insights into the past could help to inform how landscapes are managed in the future.

  • Air pollution in New York City linked to wildfires hundreds of miles away
    on January 22, 2020 at 1:06 pm

    A new study shows that air pollutants from the smoke of fires from as far as Canada and the southeastern US traveled hundreds of miles and several days to reach Connecticut and New York City, where it caused significant increases in pollution concentrations.

  • Human-sparked fires smaller, less intense but more frequent with longer seasons
    on January 22, 2020 at 1:05 pm

    Fires started by people have steadily increased in recent decades, sparking a major shift in U.S. wildfire norms, according to a new study. The research found human-caused wildfires are more frequent, smaller, less hot and occur over longer seasons than fires started by lightning.

  • Brazilian wildfire pollution worsens air quality in distant cities
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    Wildfires in south eastern Brazil produce airborne pollution that worsens air quality in major cities such as Sao Paulo — cancelling out efforts to improve the urban environment and posing health risks to citizens, according to a new study.

  • Setting controlled fires to avoid wildfires
    on January 20, 2020 at 4:34 pm

    Despite having proven effective at reducing wildfire risks, prescribed burns have been stymied by perceived and real risks, regulations and resource shortages. A new analysis highlights ways of overcoming those barriers, offering solutions for wildfire-ravaged landscapes.